Emotions

Do We Intervene? How?

Interesting op-ed from the New York Times on the recent student protest during a talk by Christina Hoff Sommers at Lewis & Clark Law School. As the author points out, the current political moment is fraught and toxic, which can make people “jumpy” when it comes to certain topics.

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Business As Usual-2: Boys Will Be Boys

This one we’re calling “Boys Will Be Boys — It’s Human Nature.” Many people assume that boys fight. I know my boys did and I didn’t constantly try to break up their fights. I thought that they were inevitable, and it was important to let them learn how to resolve their conflicts on their own.

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Interests, Positions, Needs, and Values

Politics is very often fought over positions more than interests. Everyone in the U.S. shares the same interests: we want to have good jobs and we want those jobs to be safe; we want our families to be healthy, safe, and have opportunities to thrive

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The Challenge of Complex, Intractable Conflicts

We believe that society’s chronic inability to constructively handle intractable conflict constitutes a threat to human welfare that is at least as serious as that posed by climate change, infectious disease, or any of today’s other big social, political, economic, and environmental challenges.

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Why Can’t We Fix Anything Anymore?

The answer that Guy and I have is that almost all of the problems that they identify that are in need of fixing our underlain by conflict problems and we haven’t learned how to deal successfully with intractable conflict. Let me illustrate.
 

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Pick a Mood, any Mood – Just Pick a Good One

There aren’t many benefits to being in a bad mood, even if that’s your reliable, long-standing default mode. Being in a bad mood can make you less effective, less open to creative solutions, and due to stress, it can affect your health.  Most peoples’ jobs have a degree of stress, some much more than others.

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A Complexity-Oriented Approach

The MOOS seminars all take what we call a complexity-oriented approach to intractability and responses to it.  While our primary focus is on very large-scale conflicts (the kind that involve millions of people), much of what we have to say is also applicable to smaller scale conflicts.

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